From Bhagwan to Osho: Prequel to Osho's name change

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This page features material that predates related material presented elsewhere. Since it does not fit well in the flow there, though deeply related, it appears here, as a "prequel".

That other page, From Bhagwan to Osho: The story, features a series of quotes from Osho's discourses of Dec 1988 to Feb 1989 relating to the changes his name was going through, the major part of that detailing the many times he comments on the use of the word "Osho" in Japanese Zen. As these comments came in such a concentrated way, all in a period of less than three weeks, and shortly before his adoption of "Osho" as his name, it seems obvious and natural to conclude that he was suggesting that his people call him that. Indeed, another article, From Bhagwan to Osho: What's in a name?, asserts just that, though the existence of a widely believed competing theory about the origin of Osho's name requires that article to devote the bulk of its bytespace to debunking that.

As it happens, there are a number of occasions prior to that name-change period when Osho comments on "Osho" and its usage. The first is in Jun 1988, over six months before he begins the process of dropping "Bhagwan" and moving to "Osho." Six additional comments and mentions have been found before Dec 1988. It is believed that these are all there are. There are no others in Osho's "Zen period" from Apr 22 1988 to Apr 10 1989.

In what follows below, all framed material is from Osho's books, with sutras / anecdotes in ALL-CAPS, and Osho's comments in ordinary type.

From This. This. A Thousand Times This, ch 11, 6 Jun 1988

A MONK CAME FROM JOSHU OSHO'S ASSEMBLY TO UKYU...
Both are great masters and it was almost a natural phenomenon to move from one master's assembly to another just to see whether the same experience is happening everywhere. Ukyu was very famous, particularly because he was the first Zen master to use the stick.
A MONK CAME FROM JOSHU OSHO'S ASSEMBLY TO UKYU, WHO SAID TO HIM, "WHAT DO YOU FIND IN JOSHU'S TEACHING? IS THERE ANYTHING DIFFERENT FROM WHAT YOU FIND HERE?"
THE MONK SAID, "NOTHING DIFFERENT."
UKYU SAID, "IF THERE IS NOTHING DIFFERENT, WHY DON'T YOU GO BACK THERE?" AND HE HIT HIM WITH HIS STICK.
He is making the point clear that every master has some uniqueness. The ultimate experience may be the same but the paths to it are many. According to the master, different flowers blossom on the path.
"If there is no difference then why have you come?" -- and he hit him with his stick to make it clear that at least that much is different: "Your master has never hit you."
THE MONK SAID, "IF YOUR STICK HAD EYES TO SEE, YOU WOULD NOT STRIKE ME LIKE THAT."
The monk is not a humble man but arrogant. The hit of Ukyu was out of compassion to wake him up. Rather than being thankful, he said, "IF YOUR STICK HAD EYES TO SEE, YOU WOULD NOT STRIKE ME LIKE THAT."
UKYU SAID, "TODAY I HAVE COME ACROSS A MONK," AND HE GAVE HIM THREE MORE BLOWS.
THE MONK WENT OUT. UKYU CALLED AFTER HIM AND SAID, "ONE MAY RECEIVE UNFAIR BLOWS."
You should not go this way: without answering or without asking why you have been hit.
THE MONK WENT OUT. UKYU CALLED AFTER HIM AND SAID, "ONE MAY RECEIVE UNFAIR BLOWS."
THE MONK TURNED BACK AND SAID, "TO MY REGRET, THE STICK IS IN YOUR HAND."
These were very great people and great days. This kind of dialogue is very special to Zen.
UKYU SAID, "IF YOU NEED IT, I WILL LET YOU HAVE IT."
THE MONK WENT UP TO UKYU, SEIZED HIS STICK, AND GAVE HIM THREE BLOWS WITH IT.
UKYU SAID, "UNFAIR BLOWS! UNFAIR BLOWS!"
THE MONK SAID, "ONE MAY RECEIVE THEM."
UKYU SAID, "I HIT THIS ONE TOO CASUALLY."
You were not worthy of it.
The moment he said,
"I HIT THIS ONE TOO CASUALLY,"
THE MONK MADE BOWS.
UKYU SAID, "OSHO!"
Osho is a very honorable word. It is almost used for the masters. For example Joshu Osho. Osho is not his name but his honor, his acceptance as an enlightened man.
UKYU SAID, "OSHO! IS THAT HOW YOU TAKE LEAVE?"
THE MONK LAUGHED ALOUD AND WENT OUT.
UKYU SAID, "THAT'S IT! THAT'S IT!"

This first (known) usage is unusual in that a master is addressing a seeker in this respectful fashion. This of course is an essential part of the device in the anecdote, whereby the master really catches the seeker's attention, which has remained impervious even to Ukyu's allowing the seeker to beat him.

From Zen: The Diamond Thunderbolt, ch 2, 13 Jul 1988

(Context: before Tokusan became a great master in his own right, he came to Isan's temple as a seeker.)

TOKUSAN CAME TO ISAN'S TEMPLE. CARRYING HIS PILGRIM'S BUNDLE UNDER HIS ARM, HE CROSSED THE LECTURE HALL, FROM EAST TO WEST AND WEST TO EAST; THEN, STARING AROUND, HE SAID, "MEW, MEW," AND WENT OUT.
TOKUSAN REACHED THE GATE, BUT THEN SAID TO HIMSELF, "I SHOULD NOT BE IN A HURRY."
What transpired is very simple. Tokusan is saying to Isan, "I am just like a cat, MEW, MEW. Are you capable of teaching an innocent animal? I am utterly ignorant, as ignorant as an animal -- are you capable? And I have been searching from east to west, from west to east, and I have not yet come across the man who can be my master."
Because Isan did not say anything TOKUSAN REACHED THE GATE, BUT THEN SAID TO HIMSELF, "I SHOULD NOT BE IN A HURRY. This has been too quick, this inquiry, I did not give enough chance to Isan.
I SHOULD NOT BE IN A HURRY," SO HE DRESSED AND ENTERED A SECOND TIME TO HAVE AN INTERVIEW. ISAN WAS SITTING IN HIS PLACE.
TOKUSAN, HOLDING UP HIS KNEELING CLOTH, SAID, "OSHO!"
'Osho' is a word signifying great respect, love and gratitude. It also sounds beautiful.
"OSHO!" ISAN MADE AS IF TO TAKE UP HIS STAFF. THEN TOKUSAN GAVE A "KWATZ!" SHOUT, SWUNG HIS SLEEVES, AND WENT OUT. WITH HIS BACK TURNED TO THE LECTURE HALL, TOKUSAN PUT ON HIS STRAW SANDALS AND WENT OFF.
IN THE EVENING, ISAN ASKED THE CHIEF MONK, "THE NEW ARRIVAL -- WHERE IS HE?"
"THE CHIEF MONK SAID, "WHEN HE WENT OUT HE TURNED HIS BACK ON THE LECTURE HALL."
These words are not to be understood directly, but in a very indirect way. By turning his back on the lecture hall he is saying, "I am not interested in lectures, in words, in scriptures."
He put on his sandals and went away.
ISAN SAID, "SOME DAY THAT FELLOW WILL GO TO AN ISOLATED MOUNTAINTOP, ESTABLISH A HERMITAGE AND SCOLD THE BUDDHAS AND ABUSE THE PATRIARCHS."
Anyone who does not know the tradition of Zen will think that Isan is condemning him, but he is praising. He is saying, "That fellow is really made of the stuff a seeker needs to be made of. First he came and without asking a word simply said, 'Mew, Mew,' and without waiting for an answer went out. I was simply watching him. He crossed the hall from east to west, from west to east, just to show me that he had been to many, many masters. 'You are not new. Do you recognize me as a seeker? Are you ready to be a master to a man who is as innocent as an animal?'
"Before I could say anything he went out, but then he thought that it was too quick a departure, I should give a little chance to the old man.' Then he came in and with great respect, simply said, 'Osho!' But I could not accept him, because he is made of a different stuff."
There are two kinds of disciples, those who will insist on finding the truth alone and those who like to accompany a master, becoming his shadow, peacefully, silently dissolving themselves into the master.

From Zen: The Diamond Thunderbolt, ch 3, 14 Jul 1988

ONE DAY A MONK CAME ALONG, AND, NOT KNOWING HE WAS SPEAKING TO THE MASTER, ASKED BOKUSHU THE WAY TO THE MASTER'S ROOM.
BOKUSHU TOOK OFF HIS SANDAL AND HIT THE MONK ON THE HEAD WITH IT -- THE MONK RAN OFF.
THEN BOKUSHU CALLED TO HIM, "OSHO!" AND THE MONK TURNED HIS HEAD.
"THAT'S THE WAY TO IT," BOKUSHU SAID, POINTING WITH HIS FINGER.
What has happened in this incident? Unless you lose your head, you cannot find your heart. Hitting the head of the monk with his sandal is simply a way of saying, "Please stop thinking." Except for thought, nothing is a barrier to truth. But the monk became afraid, "This seems to be a madman. I am asking the way to the master's room and he hits me. It is better to run away from here. He may do something even more nasty." So he ran away.
Bokushu called him back, "OSHO!"
‘Osho' is a very respectful word. It is a way of calling someone almost divine. It is in essence so respectful that only a disciple calls a master 'Osho'.
Bokushu called after him,"OSHO!" indicating: "Don't be afraid and don't escape. It is against your dignity. You are to me as worthy of respect as Buddha himself." And saying,"OSHO!" he said, pointing to his own room, "THAT'S THE WAY TO IT."
This kind of incident is impossible in this world today unless you are humble enough. If the master hits with his sandal on your head, you will start fighting with him. You will not think that he is a man worthy of respect. He will seem to be insane -- you are simply asking the way and he hits you.
But once a different world existed. Bokushu did both things: first he hit him on the head with his sandal, and then he called him, "OSHO!" -- You are also a master; who you are looking for? If you are looking for the master, this is the way. Drop your head outside; be humble, innocent. In your silence, without thought, you may find the master.
Then, in the guided Let-Go meditation at the end of the discourse, this word "Osho" comes twice again, once when addressing everyone and once when Osho calls to drummer Nivedano to punctuate the stages of the meditation. And for good measure, the word "oceanic" also makes a miraculous appearance. (See Comments below for the significance of these unique occurrences and more.)
Be silent.
Close your eyes.
No movement of the body.
Just become frozen
so that you can enter into yourself.
This silence, Osho,
this silence, the buddha.
Deeper, deeper, deeper.
The deeper you go, the more oceanic
becomes the experience.
The dewdrop slips from the lotus leaf
and disappears in the ocean.
This is our eternal reality.
This is our divineness.
There is no other God than this experience.
There is no other prayer
than this tremendous silence,
this peace, this ecstasy.
To make it deeper, Osho, Nivedano ...
(Drumbeat)

Comments

There are a number of features in this discourse, instances of Osho using the word "Osho" which stand out compared to his usage on other occasions. Yes, one "shouldn't" compare, but ...

  1. On this occasion more than any other, Osho seems to be explicitly inviting his people to call him Osho. He says, "It is in essence so respectful that only a disciple calls a master 'Osho'". This has to be considered more explicit than the hints he was dropping during Jan-Feb 1989, but of course here he still has a name, so who is going to make anything out of it at this point?
  2. This occasion is also the only one with any "Osho" appearing in the Let-Go part after the discoursing and jokes, and in a free-floating, free-associating way, not connected with any "sensible" expounding on what it is or how it is used.
  3. In fact, "Osho" appears twice in the Let-Go portion, the second time while addressing drummer Nivedano. Nivedano claims that, having heard Osho describe the use of "Osho" in Zen the previous night, he began addressing Osho as Osho in letters the very next morning, and that Osho is responding to him here.
  4. It is also, as mentioned above, remarkable for its use of the word "oceanic", in proximity to "Osho". In fact, in all of Osho's talks, as determined by the CD-ROM, this talk at the end, not even a discourse per se, is the only occasion when the two words come near each other. But there is virtually no conceptual content connecting them, so there cannot be said to be any "explanation" happening. Even to infer some kind of relationship beyond sounding alike would be to stretch a point too far. Thus, advocates of the William James Version (WJV, the alternate "explanation" for Osho's name), will find little comfort in this proximity. For a full consideration of the WJV, see From Bhagwan to Osho: What's in a name?.
  5. Of all the discourses in which Osho comments on the significance of "Osho", this is the one cited by Ma Deva Sarito in her Rajneesh Times editorial of Apr 1 1989 reporting the meeting in Buddha Hall on Feb 27 when sannyasins collectively "decided to call Him 'Osho Rajneesh'."

From Hyakujo: The Everest of Zen, ch 9, 4 Oct 1988

BELOVED OSHO,
ON ONE OCCASION, ISAN, GOHO AND UNGAN, WERE ALL STANDING TOGETHER IN ATTENDANCE ON HYAKUJO.
HYAKUJO SAID TO ISAN, "WITH YOUR MOUTH AND LIPS CLOSED, HOW WOULD YOU SAY IT?"
ISAN SAID, "I WOULD ASK YOU TO SAY IT."
HYAKUJO SAID, "I COULD SAY IT, BUT IF I DID SO, I FEAR I SHOULD HAVE NO SUCCESSORS."
HYAKUJO TURNED TO GOHO. "WITH YOUR MOUTH AND LIPS CLOSED, HOW WOULD YOU SAY IT?" HE ASKED HIS SECOND DISCIPLE.
GOHO SAID, "OSHO! YOU SHOULD SHUT UP!"
HYAKUJO SAID, "IN THE DISTANT LAND WHERE NO ONE STIRS, I SHALL SHADE MY EYES WITH MY HAND AND WATCH FOR YOU."
THEN HYAKUJO ASKED UNGAN, "WITH YOUR MOUTH AND LIPS CLOSED, HOW WOULD YOU SAY IT?"
UNGAN SAID, "OSHO, DO YOU HAVE THEM OR NOT?"
HYAKUJO SAID, "MY SUCCESSORS WILL BE MISSING."
Maneesha, this is the last talk on Hyakujo, and the piece that you have chosen is the strangest -- a beautiful ending, showing Hyakujo at his peak.
ON ONE OCCASION, ISAN, GOHO AND UNGAN, WERE ALL STANDING TOGETHER IN ATTENDANCE ON HYAKUJO. These three were the most intimate disciples. One of the three was going to be the successor -- so was the rumor. In the thousands of disciples these three were possible successors. And every master, before choosing, asks a question which is in fact a koan which cannot be answered.
HYAKUJO SAID TO ISAN... This was the evening of his life, time to depart from the world. He was in search now for whom to transmit the light that he had carried his whole life. He asked Isan, "WITH YOUR MOUTH AND LIPS CLOSED, HOW WOULD YOU SAY IT?"
[...]
Zen calls the ultimate experience, it -- neither he nor she. That comes very close to the point of how God can be male or God can be female. It can only be a neutral life principle which can express itself in thousands of ways in men, in women, in trees, in mountains. Those are all just his expressions. In reality, hidden behind all these expressions, is a pure life principle. It can only be called it.
So when Hyakujo asked, "WITH YOUR MOUTH AND LIPS CLOSED, HOW WOULD YOU SAY IT?" Those who are not acquainted with the world of Zen, will be simply surprised, "What are you asking, what is it! In the first place you are asking an impossible thing: 'With your mouth and lips closed,' and in the second place you are asking, 'How would you say it?' -- two mysteries in one question."
ISAN SAID, "I WOULD ASK YOU TO SAY IT." He challenged his master: "It is impossible, but I will give you a chance. If I cannot say it, I want you to say it. With your lips closed, with your mouth shut, say it."
HYAKUJO SAID, "I COULD SAY IT, BUT IF I DID SO, I FEAR I SHOULD HAVE NO SUCCESSORS." What he is saying is, "If I have to say it, then you are not capable of being my successor. I can say it. Neither the lips are needed nor the mouth. Just a good hit and you will know it that I have said it." Ordinarily Hyakujo was not very much into hitting people. Perhaps this was the first time he had gone so far: "My hit is going to be so great that perhaps you will fall dead. I won't have any successors. And even if you survive my hit, you would have disqualified yourself. You have not answered. Rather than answering my question, you have questioned me -- and this is a test to choose a successor."
HYAKUJO TURNED TO GOHO. "WITH YOUR MOUTH AND LIPS CLOSED, HOW WOULD YOU SAY IT?" HE ASKED HIS SECOND DISCIPLE.
GOHO SAID, "OSHO! YOU SHOULD SHUT UP!"
It is a little better than the first answer from Isan: "I would ask you to say it." He is simply accepting his defeat, but hiding it in a circular way rather than saying, "I cannot say it." Even if he had remained silent without saying it, that would have been far better. But very stupidly he said, "I WOULD ASK YOU..." He was not the master and he was not going to choose his successor. Hyakujo was the master almost on the verge of death.
The second disciple Goho did a little better. GOHO SAID, "OSHO!" Osho is a very honorable word. There are many respectful words, but the sweetness of Osho, the love, the respect, the gratitude, all are together in it. It is just like Christians using "reverend", but that is no comparison to it. Just the very sound of Osho -- even if we don't understand Japanese, the very sound is very sweet. He said, "OSHO! YOU SHOULD SHUT UP!"
It looks very contradictory, on the one hand addressing him with the most honorable word in Japanese, and on the other hand telling him "YOU SHOULD SHUT UP!" but that is how Zen is. It is as sharp as a sword -- it cuts hard and straight to the heart --and it is as soft as a lotus leaf. It is both together. It is not right for the disciple to say to the master, "YOU SHOULD SHUT UP!" To avoid the disrespectfulness of his answer, he first addresses the master, Osho! Don't misunderstand me. I have great respect and love for you, but you are asking nonsense. You should shut up. At the moment of death, have you gone a little senile. Just shut up!
HYAKUJO SAID, "IN THE DISTANT LAND WHERE NO ONE STIRS, I SHALL SHADE MY EYES WITH MY HAND AND WATCH FOR YOU."
Beautifully, he has rejected. He is not accepted as a successor because he has not answered the question. But yet he has been very careful. Although he has not answered, he has been very loving, honoring, grateful. Out of this gratitude and love he has earned a special virtue. Hyakujo says, "IN THE DISTANT LAND..." Somewhere in the universe, if we meet sometime, WHERE NO ONE STIRS -- where everything is silent, utterly quiet -- I SHALL SHADE MY EYES WITH MY HAND AND WATCH FOR YOU. He is saying, "You can be my companion, but you cannot be my successor. Somewhere faraway in the distant future at some corner of the universe I will watch for you. You will reach to the goal. Of that I am certain." But saying this he has rejected him as a successor. His answer was better than Isan's answer.
THEN HYAKUJO ASKED UNGAN, "WITH YOUR MOUTH AND LIPS CLOSED, HOW WOULD YOU SAY IT?"
UNGAN SAID, "OSHO, DO YOU HAVE THEM OR NOT?" It is a little better. With tremendous respect he says, "Osho, what are you asking, do you have it already or not. If you have it, then what is the point of asking. And if you don't have it, you will not understand it." But this too is not the answer. Although the second answer is better than the other, Hyakujo sadly said, "MY SUCCESSORS WILL BE MISSING." I will not have any successor, it seems. You are all well versed, you are all great scholars, you have tremendous love and respect for me, but that is not enough for the successor.
What is enough, what is needed is that the successor should be able to say it. His whole life will be devoted to teaching people, to provoking people, to challenging people to get it. If he cannot say it, how can he be a successor?

From Joshu: The Lion's Roar, ch 6, 20 Oct 1988

One Zen monk is reported to have said -- every morning of his life after his enlightenment, the first thing in the morning he would say was, "Osho!" Because he has become enlightened now, an honorable word has to be used....
"Reverence" ["Your Reverence" is used as a term of address in a preceding anecdote] is a little less than "Osho". "Reverence" only means respect; "Osho" also means respect, and love, and gratitude. You may not have thought about it -- because people don't think about words; otherwise strange meanings come out of them. Have you ever thought? -- "respect" simply means looking back: re-spect, looking once again. It simply means that somebody is so beautiful that you have to look again, one more time; you cannot just go on without looking again. Out of this, "respectfulness" has arisen.
But "Osho" contains some more elements: love and gratitude. It is much more than "reverence". "Reverence" is a Christian word and is used for learned bishops, missionaries, priests. "Osho" cannot be translated correctly as "reverence" because it is used only for the enlightened ones, not the learned ones.
And this Zen master used to call every morning, "Osho, are you still here?" He was asking himself about his own presence: "Are you still here? Then have a cup of tea!"
His disciples knew perfectly well that every morning this was the first thing he would say to himself, so they kept ready the samovar, making its song. And they would ask him, "Master, why do you do this?"
And he used to say, "I am so surprised that existence has given one day again for me. I don't deserve, I am not worthy of it. I have not done anything to deserve another day, another sunrise, and the whole sky, and the whole universe. I just want to make sure that I am here. This beautiful universe one day will be taken away from me."
And he used to answer himself also. First he will say, "Osho, are you here?"
And he will say, "Yes sir."
Then he will say, "Then have a cup of tea!"
This was a monologue. The disciples produced the cup of tea. They loved the master, they loved this small, beautiful approach to the morning. The night is over -- it is symbolic of the night in which most of us live the whole life; the morning never comes.
A cup of tea declares that the night is over, wake up! Be aware and see the whole beauty of existence. The universe has allowed you one day more -- you cannot demand, it is a gift. One day the sun will rise and the roses will blossom but you will not be there to celebrate this new morning. And there is no way to complain, it is absolutely in the hands of the cosmos.
But we have not paid our gratitude even for our life. Do you think there can be anything more precious than life, than consciousness? And existence gives it to you without asking any payment in return. At least you can be thankful. This thankfulness is the only authentic prayer; all other prayers are childish, they are nothing but hidden demands.

From Rinzai: Master of the Irrational, ch 7, 30 Oct 1988

In this strange anecdote, Rinzai goes to another monastery and appears to be disrespectful to the teacher there. But even in that context, Osho indicates that his use of "Osho" shows a respect which overshadows the outward appearances:

ONCE, WHEN KINGYU SAW RINZAI COMING TO HIS MONASTERY, HE SAT IN HIS ROOM HOLDING HIS STICK CROSSWISE. RINZAI STRUCK THE STICK THREE TIMES WITH HIS HAND, THEN ENTERED THE MONKS' HALL AND SAT DOWN IN THE FIRST SEAT.
Obviously the first seat belonged to Kingyu; he was the master of the monastery. And this is strange behavior from a guest, that he knocks first the stick of the master three times, and then, without saying anything, enters the assembly hall and sits in the place of the master.
KINGYU CAME IN, SAW RINZAI, AND SAID, "IN AN ENCOUNTER BETWEEN HOST AND GUEST, EACH SHOULD OBSERVE THE CUSTOMARY FORMALITIES."
That's where Rinzai differs, and any great master will differ. Kingyu had many more disciples than Rinzai, because the masses could understand him more clearly. He was following in a way the formalities of the masses. He expects Rinzai also...
He says to Rinzai, "IN AN ENCOUNTER BETWEEN HOST AND GUEST" -- he thinks he is the host, which formally he is, and Rinzai is a guest, which formally he is -- "EACH SHOULD OBSERVE THE CUSTOMARY FORMALITIES."
There Rinzai does not agree, and no great master can agree. Traditional formalities? Then what is Zen all about? It is the revolution against the formal. It is all for the spontaneous, not for the customary.
"WHERE ARE YOU FROM, AND WHY ARE YOU SO RUDE?"
He is not rude. On the surface he will appear rude to anybody, but he is exactly expressing his position. When he struck three times on the stick, he told his host, "Try to understand that a greater master is here. You are only a formal teacher."
Those three strikings on the stick show that from now onwards, "formally, you are the host; but in existence I am the host, you are the guest." What is true on the surface is not necessarily true at the center.
Rinzai is saying, "A master has come to a disciple." He has made it clear by striking the stick of Kingyu that from now onwards, "While I'm here, I am the master." He is not being rude, he is simply being straightforward, and that is the quality of an authentic master.
Kingyu asked him, "WHERE ARE YOU FROM, AND WHY ARE YOU SO RUDE?" He could not understand the behavior, although the behavior is clear. The master has struck three times on Kingyu's stick, and he is sitting in his seat in the assembly hall.
Rinzai is saying, "You are a mere teacher, you are not yet a master. Whatever you know is mere knowledge, it is not your own existential experience."
"WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT, OLD OSHO?" ANSWERED RINZAI. OSHO is a very honorable word. Just in a single word he has said, "I have not been rude; I have just declared that I have come here."
"WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT, OLD OSHO? You are old and you are well respected by me, but that does not mean that you know the truth. You have strived hard your whole life, you disciplined yourself, you have been training yourself, but you have not yet got the point. I respect you, your old age, your lifelong effort.
"I am not rude, but truth has to be said even if it appears to be rude. WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT, OLD OSHO?"
By the word "osho" he has made the position clear: "I am not rude, and I cannot be rude to anybody. It is really out of compassion that I have struck on your stick, showing you that you don't deserve to have it. It should be in my hands. You did not understand, that's why I had to come to the assembly hall and sit in the position where you used to sit.
"Obviously you are feeling insulted, but all I am saying is that the moment a real master enters, then he is always the host, he is never the guest."
AS KINGYU WAS ABOUT TO OPEN HIS MOUTH TO REPLY, RINZAI STRUCK HIM. He did not allow him to speak, because it is not a question of speaking, it is not a dialogue.
Try to understand: don't be bothered about words, but the actual situation. He was going to open his mouth means he was going to say something. Rinzai struck him to say, "Don't say anything, see! Don't get lost into explanations, just see the situation, just look into my eyes!"
KINGYU PRETENDED TO FALL DOWN. RINZAI HIT HIM AGAIN -- because no pretensions are allowed in Zen. Either you fall down, not by any effort but as a happening... You don't pretend; it is not a drama.
KINGYU PRETENDED TO FALL DOWN. RINZAI HIT HIM AGAIN. Now this hit is for his pretension -- not only this pretending to fall, but his whole life is a pretension. He is not a master, yet he has been pretending to be the master.
KINGYU SAID, "TODAY THINGS WERE NOT TO MY ADVANTAGE."
That is not the response of one who has understood. He is still thinking in terms of advantage. He has not understood the meaning of the behavior of Rinzai. He throws the responsibility, like everybody else in the world, on destiny, on kismet, on the lines of the hand, on the birth chart -- all kinds of stupid excuses. "What can I do? TODAY THINGS WERE NOT TO MY ADVANTAGE."
The reality is that Rinzai did too much, gave him again and again opportunities to understand -- which would have been one of the greatest days in his life -- that a master has walked down from his hill to his monastery, uninvited, and tried to wake him up. But he is thinking of advantages....

From Isan: No Footprints in the Blue Sky, ch 1, 1 Nov 1988

This is an unusual instance, with Osho illustrating the meaning of "Osho" by using it, as if already understood, to "explain" the meaning of "Hazrat" in a story about a Muslim relic being desecrated. It is a single occurrence, with little bearing on the use in Zen or Osho's name, so no need for details.

see also
Osho's names
From Bhagwan to Osho: The story
From Bhagwan to Osho: Prequel to Osho's name change
From Bhagwan to Osho: Publications table
From Bhagwan to Osho: What's in a name?
From Bhagwan to Osho: Website survey