The Long and the Short and the All

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"You ask what my message is? It is a brief one indeed: those who are awake are alive; those who are asleep miss everything.
No man is given manhood ready-made. He has to build it by himself. This is both a blessing and a bane. It is a blessing because he is free to create himself; it is a bane because there is always the possibility he will die without ever having become a man." (Osho, Ch. 1.)
translated from
Hindi :
Prem Ke Pankh (प्रेम के पंख) = "Wings of Love"
Naye Sanket (नये संकेत) = previously translated with Wings of Love in Wings of Love and Random Thoughts.
Main Kaun Hun? (मैं कौन हूं?) (writings) = Who Am I
Agyat Ki Or (अज्ञात की ओर) = Towards the Unknown
Main Mrityu Sikhata Hun (मैं मृत्यु सिखाता हूं), ch.1-2 = The Mysteries of Life and Death
For a detailed table of the English sources see the discussion.
notes
Read this book as PDF or create a free account at osho.com to read the book online.
Later published as part of Osho Books on CD-ROM.
Details of when and where these discourses are from originally are scanty. Parts of Who Am I are from Mar 1967 and Kullu Manali in Aug 1969 has been mentioned as a possibility. Amrit Kan is said to have been published before 1965, and Prem Ke Pankh sometime in 1969. Specific sources aside, the book is a collection of short and long extracts grouped thematically into six subject-chapters: Knowledge and Understanding, Truth and Science, Religion and Education, Thought and Vision, Life and Death, and Love and Happiness.
For an account of the communication with Osho about this book to Krishna Prem, see below "#About the editing by KP".
time period of Osho's original talks/writings
1965 to 1969? : timeline
number of discourses/chapters
6


editions

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The Long and the Short and the All

Year of publication : 1975
Publisher : Motilal Banarsidass
ISBN Unknown (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : ?
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : ?
Edition notes :
Mentioned by Neeten in the bibliography of the Osho Source Book. The title is quoted as "The Long, the Short and the All".

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The Long and the Short and the All

Year of publication : 1979
Publisher : Motilal Banarsidass
ISBN 0-89684-064-6 ("Paper", but this ISBN is printed in this cloth-bound hardcover.) (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : 260
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : H
Edition notes : First Edition: Delhi, 1979. © 1979 Rajneesh Foundation, Poona (India)
Size : 221 x 145 x 22 mm
Author as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh
Editor Sw Krishna Prem
Printed in India By Shantilal Jain, at Shri Jainendra Press, A45, Phase-1, Industrial Area, Naraina, New Delhi-110 028.
Published by Narendra Prakash Jain, for Motilal Banarsidass, Bungalow Road, Jawahar Nagar, Delhi-110 007.
Introduction Sw Krishna Prem, October, 1977, Poona.

431 lrg.jpg

The Long and the Short and the All

Year of publication : 1979
Publisher : Motilal Banarsidass
ISBN 0-89684-064-6 ("Paper") (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : 260
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : P
Edition notes : First Edition: Delhi, 1979.
(As in the 1979 hardcover edition.)

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The Long and the Short and the All

Excerpts from early discourses and letters

Year of publication : 1984
Publisher : Rajneesh Foundation
ISBN 0-88050-708-X (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : 280
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : P
Edition notes : First U.S. Printing: July 1984 - 10,000 copies. Copyright: © 1984 Rajneesh Foundation International.
Size : 178 x 108 x 16 mm
Author as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh
Published by Ma Anand Sheela M.M., D.Phil.M., D.Litt.M.(RIMU), Acharya
Editor Sw Krishna Prem, M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Acharya
Design Ma Deva Padma
Direction: Ma Yoga Pratima, M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Arihanta
Printed in U.S.A.
Library of Congress Catalog Number 84-42806
Introduction Sw Krishna Prem, M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Acharya

About the editing by KP

Here is a quote from Krishna Prem's book Osho, India and Me, p.178 and 181 ff., when Osho asked him to re-edit this book :

(...) I find Vivek in the kitchen, putting together a tea tray to take to Osho. She takes the introduction straight in, telling me to wait. A few moments later she comes back down the hall, smiling, holding four little paperbacks in her hand. “I know,” I say before she can speak, “he wants me to make these into one book too. Right?”
Right,” she laughs, turning into the kitchen again.
“And how goes the book?” Laxmi asks the next day as we have tea in her office, empty except for me and her for a change. I bring her up to date on what I've finished and show her the four books I’m now going to start editing. “But I’d like to be closer, Laxmi. Is there some place here in the commune where I could work?” (...)


“Veena,” I ask, interrupting her sewing. “The book is finished and I've just done the introduction. It’s quite brief. Would you read it to me and let me hear how it sounds?”
She reaches over for it, adjusts her glasses. “Some things in life are as ageless as the stars, as enduring as a smile,” she reads. “Some things soar above impermanence and change and carry you to everlastingness. Truth is like this. And the words of Osho are like this.
“This volume is a mosaic, a mixed bag of tricks. There are one-liners to shock you, anecdotes to shake you and questions to stir your heart. There are tales to provoke you, talks to inspire you and treatises that will turn you into the very thirst for your own transformation.
“This book has everything. It’s a tranquil lake; it’s a roaring waterfall. Its the nightingale’s song; it’s the hornet’s sting. It’s a garden in the sunshine; its the jungle on the darkest night.
“It’s the long and the short and the all.”
“What was that?” I hear behind me. I turn to see Vivek standing in the door.
“The introduction to the last book, I explain. I've just finished it.
I'm just on my way in," she says, whipping the sheet of paper from Verna’s hand and turning on her heel. “I’ll take it in and see what he has to say.”
A few moments later shes back. “It’s fine. He says you should title the book as well.”
Masking my surprise, I look at the introduction she’s returned to me, hoping for instant inspiration. “It’s obvious,” I say. “I’ll just call it The Long and the Short and the All. Did he say what he wants me to do next?”
“Laxmis coming back from Gujarat tonight and he wants to talk to her first. I don't know what he has in mind, but he said to tell you to take the rest of the day off. You know,” she laughs, “in all these years this is the first time I’ve ever heard him tell anyone to take a day off!”