Adhyatma Upanishad ~ 12

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अध्यात्म उपनिषद ~ 12

event type discourse
date & time 19 Oct 1972, 8:00
location Mount Abu, meditation camp
language Hindi & English
audio Available, duration 2h 5min. Quality: good (under revision).
online audio
video Not available
online video
see also
online text find a PDF transcript of this event
shorttitle FINGER12 & THOU46
notes
See Talk:Osho Timeline 1972#That Art Thou. English part of this event published as That Art Thou #46
CD-ROM about That Art Thou: "Originally titled "Sarvasar Upanishad" (first 17 discourses at Matheran), "Kaivalya Upanishad" (second 17 discourses at Mt. Abu) and "Adhyatma Upanishad" (last 17 discourses at Mt. Abu). Discourses were in Hindi and English, the tapes produced as "That Art Thou" are the English parts."
synopsis
Reader of the sutra: Ma Yoga Taru, also chanting.
Hindi part:
(Translated as in Finger Pointing to the Moon on CD-ROM)
The sutra
When no desire arises for objects worthy of being enjoyed, know this as the limit of nonattachment. When no I-ness arises, know this as the limit of knowing.
When the dissolved desires do not arise back again, this is the limit of relaxedness, and such a sthitpragya, a seeker, stable in wisdom, ever remains in bliss.
He whose self is absorbed only in brahma, the ultimate reality, remains desireless and actionless. When purified by its oneness with brahma and drowned in this one single rapture, the activities of mind are choiceless and remain only as the consciousness, then it is called pragya, the wisdom. He who always has such a pragya is called jivanamukta, the one liberated while living.
One who has no I-ness for his body and the senses, and no my-ness for the other things, is a jivanamukta, the one liberated while living.
When no desire arises for objects worthy of being enjoyed, then know this as the limit of nonattachment. When no I-ness arises, know this as the limit of knowing.
English part:
(source:CD-ROM)
The sutra
When desires do not arise even in the face of the objects of enjoyment, know it as the state of vairagya -- non-attachment, desirelessness.
And when the ego ceases to rise, know it as the highest state of knowledge.
When the moods that have become extinct do not arise again, that state is known as one of the indifference.
And the sage whose wisdom has become steady attains eternal bliss. One whose mind has dissolved into the supreme becomes innocent and inactive. And the moods of the mind then dissolve in the unity of the supreme self, and the purified individual self remains choiceless and in a state of pure consciousness.
This state is called wisdom, or pragya. And one who has attained this wisdom throughout is called jivanmukta -- one free in life itself.
One who has no egoistic feeling in respect of his body and the senses, and besides has ceased to think in terms of "me" and "mine" in respect to other objects, is called a jivanmukta.


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