Glimpses of a Golden Childhood

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In what may be the juiciest, most intimate tapestry of talks ever given by an enlightened master, Osho paints the stories of his delightful, inquisitive and mischievous childhood. He began his explorations into truth with an incredible innocence and courage. With his spirited nature, he questioned every orthodox belief and everyone who blindly espoused any such belief rather than by their own authentic reason. Here are stories about Osho's childhood encounters with death, his adventures in school and his confrontations with the so- called authorities. The book is full of hilarious incidents and stories about sex, smoking, and religion, along with moving and wondrous dialogues with the local enlightened man in his village.
notes
Read this book as PDF or create a free account at osho.com to read the book online.
Later published as part of Osho Books on CD-ROM.
Part of the Nitrous Books series.
Dictated in dental sessions in Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram. The sessions were a daily occurrence, sometimes twice daily, and preceded by dental treatment. According to Sw Devageet, all tapes were destroyed on Osho's request. See discussion for an exploration of when talks were given. Dates below are a distillation / best guess from that exploration for Glimpses.
In the 1985 edition, before chapter 1, there is a page stating "Series 4", indicating continuity from Books I Have Loved. The chapters are then called "Session 1" through "Session 51".
Of these chapters, "session 29", where Osho would have talked about his adoption, contains fake material or is entirely fake. See discussion: About the Missing Session 29.
The backside of the 1985 edition has as text: "The very last words of Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh before He went into silence for an indefinite period."
The 1991 edition has "Session 1" through "Session 50", plus a 68-page Appendix. In this edition, session 29 of the 1985 edition is missing and the rest of the sessions are renumbered.
The Appendix consists of longer quotes from earlier discourses where Osho talks about his childhood.
The CD-ROM (1994) for this book states "51 chapters" and then in fact shows 50 chapters, with chapter 29 missing and the rest re-numbered.
time period of Osho's original talks/writings
approximately Dec 1981 to Feb 1982 : timeline
number of discourses/chapters
51 (for the 1985 edition)   (see table of contents)
50 plus Appendix (for the 1991 edition and later)


editions

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Glimpses of a Golden Childhood

Year of publication : 1985
Publisher : Rajneesh Foundation International
Edition no. : 1
ISBN 0-88050-715-2 (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : 742
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : P
Edition notes : First edition: September 1985 - 10,000 copies. Copyright: ©1985 Rajneesh Foundation International. Contains 58 pages of B&W photo's of Osho.
Size : 178 x 108 x 44 mm
Author as Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh
Published by Bodhisattvaa Ma Anand Sheela, M.M., D.Phil.M., D.Litt.M.(RIMU), Acharya
Editors: Sambuddha Swami Devaraj, M.D., M.B., B.S., M.R.C.P., M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Acharya;
Mahasattva Swami Devageet, B.D.S., M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Acharya
Assistant editor: Bodhisattvaa Ma Deva Ashu, M.M.(RIMU), Acharya
Photography: Mahasattvaa Ma Yoga Vivek, M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Acharya
Design: Sw Anand Subhadra
Direction: Sambodhi Ma Yoga Pratima, M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Arihanta
Library of Congress Catalog Number 85-43069
Printed in the U.S.A.
Introduction Mahasattva Swami Devageet, B.D.S., M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Acharya.
For the text of this introduction, see below.

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Glimpses of a Golden Childhood

The Rebellious Childhood of a Great Enlightened One

Year of publication : 1991
Publisher : The Rebel Publishing House, Germany
Edition no. : 2
ISBN 3-89338-012-4 (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : 553
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : P
Edition notes : Second edition, revised and expanded. Copyright Osho International Foundation. Contains 58 B&W photo's of Osho.
Size : 215 x 194 x 49 mm
Editing by Sw Devaraj, M.D., M.B., B.S., M.R.C.P.; Sw Devageet, B.D.S; Ma Deva Ashu; Ma Anand Vani; Sw Krishna Prabhu
Typesetting by Ma Prem Arya
Design by Ma Krishna Gopa
Photography by Ma Prem Nirvano, Sw Premgeet, Sw Omkar Bharti, with special thanks to Sw Niklank Bharti
End paper paintings by Ma Anand Meera (Kasué Hashimoto), B.F.A. (Masashino Art University, Tokyo)
Back cover painting by Ma Deva Padma
Production by Ma Punyo, Sw Anand Surendra
Printing by Mohndruck Gütersloh, West Germany
Introduction: Sw Deva Abhinandan. For the text of this introduction, see below.

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Glimpses of a Golden Childhood

The Rebellious Childhood of a Great Enlightened One

Year of publication : 1997
Publisher : Rebel Publishing House, India
Edition no. : 3
ISBN 81-7261-072-6 (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : 561
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : P
Edition notes : Revised and expanded edition

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Glimpses of a Golden Childhood

The Rebellious Childhood of a Great Enlightened One

Year of publication : 2003
Reprint 2008
Publisher : Rebel Publishing House, India
Edition no. : 4
ISBN 81-7261-072-6 (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : 558
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : P
Edition notes : Revised edition

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Glimpses of a Golden Childhood

The Rebellious Childhood of a Great Enlightened One

Year of publication : 2015
Publisher : Rebel Publishing House, India
Edition no. :
ISBN 978-81-7261-072-2 (click ISBN to buy online)
Number of pages : 493
Hardcover / Paperback / Ebook : H
Edition notes :

table of contents

edition 1985.09
chapter titles
dictation
event location duration media
1 Session 1 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
2 Session 2 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
3 Session 3 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
4 Session 4 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
5 Session 5 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
6 Session 6 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
7 Session 7 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
8 Session 8 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
9 Session 9 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
10 Session 10 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
11 Session 11 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
12 Session 12 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
13 Session 13 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
14 Session 14 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
15 Session 15 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
16 Session 16 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
17 Session 17 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
18 Session 18 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
19 Session 19 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
20 Session 20 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
21 Session 21 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
22 Session 22 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
23 Session 23 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
24 Session 24 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
25 Session 25 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
26 Session 26 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
27 Session 27 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
28 Session 28 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
29 Session 29 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
30 Session 30 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
31 Session 31 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
32 Session 32 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
33 Session 33 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
34 Session 34 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
35 Session 35 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
36 Session 36 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
37 Session 37 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
38 Session 38 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
39 Session 39 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
40 Session 40 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
41 Session 41 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
42 Session 42 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
43 Session 43 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
44 Session 44 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
45 Session 45 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
46 Session 46 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
47 Session 47 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
48 Session 48 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
49 Session 49 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
50 Session 50 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none
51 Session 51 Nov 1981 - Feb 1982 ? Lao Tzu Grove, Rajneeshpuram unknown none

Introduction with the 1985 edition

This book is one of the most unusual books ever. It is the juiciest, most intimate glimpse of this most unique of beings, Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh.
Bhagwan is a living Buddha. In the West we prefer our religious innovators to be dead, preferably long dead. It is more comfortable that way, more secure. The most popular religions are those whose founders have been dead for the longest time. Bhagwan is alive, and very much so. His words are not faint squiggles on ancient dessicated scrolls, but direct, accurate observations from the highest peak that man's consciousness is able to attain. He speaks to us directly, vibrantly, and His very presence is a fire which finds an ember smouldering deep within each of our souls.
Bhagwan is the growing point at the pinnacle of the human tree. He has traveled all the paths, all the highways and byways open to any man through the aeons of time. He has played all the roles, has seen through all the games, done everything, been everywhere, and now He is a living statement of total fulfillment.
Whatever our race, our culture, our religious standpoint, Bhagwan can bring us to that quantum leap in consciousness which takes us high above mind into the soaring freedom of pure being. Being conditioned from the past, we think all religion needs to be heavy, full of pain and renunciation. Being with Bhagwan could not be lighter; His way is the way of laughter and song, it is full of dancing and the sheer delight to be alive right now, this very moment.
It is Bhagwan's vision to create an environment where each of us can reach to this peak of consciousness, and He calls this divine milieu "the Buddhafield." It is a place so full of awareness and love that the vibe is tangible from first contact. At this moment we are building such a place deep in the heart of Oregon, U.S.A., in Rajneeshpuram. This is the most outrageous experiment in the world, and it is taking place at this very moment. Bhagwan's vision is already a living reality.
We are witnessing the birth of a whole new man, with a whole new consciousness. Bhagwan calls him Zorba the Buddha. "Zorba" because his roots are securely in this earth, and his joy at being alive in this marvelous world is abundant and full of celebration. "Buddha" because this new man is, at one and the same time, a human being whose topmost branches merge with the sky, whose flowers dance with the sun and whose fragrance is that of existence itself. Bhagwan knows all this is possible because He is the new man, Zorba the Buddha.
As if all this weren't enough, there is more, much more. With Bhagwan there is always more; He acknowledges no limitations, known or unknown.
Enlightenment is a rare achievement, and only the most sublime people ever achieve it. Bhagwan is enlightened. It happened on March 21, 1953. Of those few souls who break through the mind into the freedom of awakened consciousness, almost none can, or wish to, bring others to that same point. But there are incredibly rare beings who can bring others to their own fulfillment. These gifted individuals are known as enlightened Masters. The greatest names in the history of mankind are these: Jesus, Mohammed, Moses, Lao Tzu, Zarathustra, Buddha, Krishna, Bodhidharma, Gurdjieff. They all changed the course of human consciousness. Bhagwan is an enlightened Master.
There is still more. Most of the Masters from the past knew one path only. It was possible for their disciples to reach the other shore but their way was single, one-dimensional. Hence their appeal was limited to a particular place, and a particular time. There is yet a final possibility for a human being: that of an enlightened Master who has traveled all previous paths, known all the ways, is utterly familiar with every method from the past, and who can orchestrate the magnificence from the past and yet innovate and bring a hitherto unknown quality of glory to man's destiny. Such a man is known as a Master of Masters. Bhagwan is a Master of Masters.
"The notes these books were compiled from fall naturally into four series.
The first series was Bhagwan simply gossiping on this and that; talking mainly of silence and beauty. The second series went deeply into the source of the ancient Tibetan mantra, Om Mani Padme Hum. But when Bhagwan gossips, He jokes, brings in all sorts of apparently unrelated topics, and each session was light and wonderful. The first two series are in a single volume called Notes of a Madman.
The third series was a recollection of books Bhagwan had read and treasured in His reading lifetime. He used to read up to twenty books each day! It was on His doctor's advice that He stopped reading, but He loved books, particularly those which give a glimpse into the unknown, whose words are bathed in light and whose beauty of expression can lead their readers to share their poetry and inspiration. This volume is called Books I Have Loved, and it is a Master's view of the world of enlightened literature.
The fourth series is called Glimpses of a Golden Childhood. Bhagwan has never spoken of His childhood, not out of secrecy, but simply because anything from before His date of enlightenment was dead to Him. In this book He again visited those early years. He gives us fascinating and hilarious tales of Himself and those closest to Him. He tells of those enlightened Masters who recognized His potential and helped Him survive His hazardous first years. He is an amazing man and He was an equally amazing child.
These notes were given in early 1981, and were His last words before He went into silence for an indefinite period of time."
--Mahasattva Sw Devageet, B.D.S., M.M., D.Phil.M.(RIMU), Acharya


Introduction with the 1991 edition

THE BOOK YOU HOLD IS a uniquely true story.
It's a story of truth.
Once upon a time in the city of Rajneeshpuram, Oregon, in that insanity we call America, the living Master Osho went to his dentist.
This in itself is not unusual. (Even the enlightened ones have teeth). What is unique is that the Master turned this seemingly ordinary occasion into an event, another chance to share his being with us. The dental work was fairly routine and, near the end, Osho said a few quiet words as if to himself. Devageet wrote them down.
Devageet had no idea then what he was doing. Little did he know that these few words were the first sparks that would ignite a great fire. But the Master knew. He had seen the words written and later that morning he called a meeting.
Four attended the mysterious meeting: Devageet, the dentist; Devaraj, Osho's personal physician; Ashu, the dental nurse; and Vivek, Osho's caretaker.
At the appointed time they were shown into Osho's room and those who had not yet seen it received a bit of a shock. Instead of the much publicized luxury, their Master was sitting in an almost bare linoleum-tiled room. There was no marble, no gold fittings, no trappings of any kind. The room was empty except for his chair and three plastic buckets.
The Oregon rain, which every winter reduced the land around to a sticky alley of mud, had penetrated the roof, and these three supermarket buckets had been strategically placed to catch the water dripping steadily through the trailer ceiling.
Osho, of course, was totally relaxed and to the rhythm of the drips motioned them to be seated. He told them that the words spoken at the dental sessions were to be taken down and made into books. Devageet was to be the notetaker. Devaraj was to edit, Ashu was to assist and type, and Vivek was to take some beautiful new photographs for the books.
Of all the recorded words of Osho, this small series of gossips from the dentist's chair were to prove the most intimate so far. It was a special kind of communion. Therefore, these words have a special flavor.
It is said the esteemed notetaker had a little trouble at first actually hearing Osho's words. They were almost a whisper. One small step from silence. They seemed to come from far far away, as though he were calling from the great height he has reached down to this earth. Yet these soft words have all the strength, all the waking power, of a lion's beautiful roar of freedom.
In the first session, Osho simply talked of this and that, weaving words of beauty and silence into a delightful tapestry of jokes and mischief. Then he began to go deeply into the source of the ancient Tibetan mantra Om Mani Padme Hum. Osho takes all the seriousness out of this usually lofty subject and these passages are wonder-filled with energy, lightness and much laughter. These first two series are contained in a single volume called Notes of a Madman.
Osho has read an amazing number of books in his lifetime and in the third series he spoke about some of the most treasured in his library. The series is called, simply, Books I Have Loved. It invites us to also savor these books, to be inspired and nourished by their poetry and beauty.
The fourth series he called Glimpses of a Golden Childhood. Suddenly Osho had begun to speak of his early years, something he had hitherto not done. Now he began to unveil a rare and wondrous gift to his disciples and to the world. He spoke of the years when his buddhahood was still a bud.
Osho is the ultimate nonconformist. He bows to no creed, no doctrine. He is this way as a man. He was this way as a child.
He took nothing at face value: the flame of rebellion against the juiceless traditions, the dried out religions and values, was already burning brightly. He was never afraid of consequences. He went his own sweet way, fearless of danger, diving into the deepest, most dangerous rivers, staying alone in the darkest night.
Even his parents, his schoolteachers, came to respect this roguish rascal of a child. It is said that while other children went outside to play, Osho went inside - in the truest sense - to find his playground.
Osho had no master in this lifetime, yet he encountered many great beings who recognized even then who this boy was. They saw his potential, the seed ready to burst into flower. This book is filled with stories of these men, their love and deep respect for Osho and, in return, his love and respect for them.
Although this series is about the Master's early life, it is in no way a conventional autobiography. Osho has more than grown up, he has grown upwards. When he speaks of his childhood, he is not giving us a personal history lesson. He has no masks, no persona; there are no boasts of what he has `done', no regrets. The stories in this book are not in chronological order; they are a stream of pure, spontaneous consciousness, direct from the timeless ocean. You cannot put the life of a Master into the framework of time.
When Osho relates a story it is not nostalgia. When he speaks with such love for his parents, his grandparents, those crazy characters he met along the way, he brings them to life, full of laughter, energy. It is alive here and now. You can feel it, share it.
It is sometimes hard to imagine, but everything Osho does is for us. He has long ago reached his own fulfillment. He has long ago found that deepest realm of silence. There is no reason for him to speak, it is all for us.
This book, these glimpses of his truly golden childhood, is just another invitation, a little more encouragement for us also to find that space in which to blossom. The pure love in these pages is simply to give us a taste, a fragrance of this miracle, this mystery of enlightenment.
This is the second edition of this book. The first was changed in a few subtle and less subtle ways by its first publisher. But the original diamond remained flawless, the changes she made are gone, and it is now back in its original form.
This edition is richer. Since the original series of talks given in 1981 Osho has spoken many times of his childhood. These stories and anecdotes have now been added in an appendix to the book - a few extra spices for this already superb banquet.
If the reader detects a few changes in style in this appendix it is due to the fact that in the original text Osho was simply relating a childhood narrative. In these additional passages, mainly from dis¬courses, he uses stories to illustrate specific points.
Much has happened in the last few years to Osho and his people. It hasn't always been easy. He never said it would be. He has been chained, imprisoned, poisoned. This beautiful individual has been treated by the unconscious world like a criminal, and his health destroyed. For more than four years after he was poisoned and expelled from America, Osho managed to keep his body together so that he could continue to work with his people. He left his body in January, 1990 in Poona, India. There, the commune which has grown up around him continues to expand and flourish.
Much has happened, yet nothing has happened, for it is still happening, moment to precious moment.
Osho says in this book: "Many times I am surprised at how the body has grown old. But as far as I am concerned, I don't feel old age or the aging process. Not even for a single moment have I felt different. I am the same; so many things have happened but only on the periphery.
"So I can tell you what has happened. But remember always, nothing has happened to me. I am just as innocent and as ignorant as I was before my birth."
And a few months before he left his body, he dictated this inscription for the crypt containing his ashes:
OSHO
NEVER BORN - NEVER DIED
ONLY VISITED THIS
PLANET EARTH BETWEEN
DECEMBER 11, 1931 - JANUARY 19, 1990
If you come to this book expecting logic, you will not find it. Masters are not logical men. What you will find is life, in all its craziness, all its love, all its laughter!
If you can read this book with an open heart, if for a few moments you can put aside your serious "grown-up," you too may have a few glimpses of your own inner child. You too may begin to play inside.
Sw Deva Abhinandan